Description

Samuel Pepys (1633–1703) was an administrator of the navy of England and Member of Parliament who is most famous for the diary he kept for a decade while still a relatively young man. Pepys had no maritime experience, but he rose to be the Chief Secretary to the Admiralty under both King Charles II and King James II through patronage, hard work, and his talent for administration. His influence and reforms at the Admiralty were important in the early professionalisation of the Royal Navy.

The detailed private diary that Pepys kept from 1660 until 1669 was first published in the 19th century and is one of the most important primary sources for the English Restoration period. It provides a combination of personal revelation and eyewitness accounts of great events, such as the Great Plague of London, the Second Dutch War, and the Great Fire of London.

Alloy:
• center: 0.925 sterling silver
• ring: 0.925 sterling silver plated with fine gold

Obverse

The fifth crowned portrait of HM Queen Elizabeth II facing right, wearing the George IV State Diadem and drop earrings.

The George IV State Diadem, officially the Diamond Diadem, is a type of crown that was made in 1820 for King George IV. The diadem is worn by queens and queens consort in procession to coronations and State Openings of Parliament. The piece of jewelry has been featured in paintings and on stamps and currency. It can be seen in the Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace.

ELIZABETH II DEI GRATIA REGINA FIDEI DEFENSATRIX means Elizabeth II, by the grace of God, Queen and Defender of the Faith.

Engraver: Jody Clark

ELIZABETH II·D·G·REG·F·D·2 POUNDS·
J.C

Reverse

Depicts a Pepys’ shorthand and a quill over the last entry in the diary.

Pepys' health suffered from the long hours that he worked throughout the period of the diary. Specifically, he believed that his eyesight had been affected by his work. He reluctantly concluded in his last entry, dated 31 May 1669, that he should completely stop writing for the sake of his eyes.

The diary was written in one of the many standard forms of shorthand used in Pepys' time, in this case called tachygraphy and devised by Thomas Shelton.

Engraver: Gary Breeze

SAMUEL PEPYS DIARIST
Samuel Pepys
May. 31. 1669.
EB
1669-2019

Edge

Samuel Pepys (May 1669): “And so I betake myself to that course, which is almost as much as to see myself go into my grave: for which, and all the discomforts that will accompany my being blind, the good God prepare me!”

THE GOOD GOD PREPARE ME

Characteristics
Type Commemorative Issue (Non-circulating)
Material Bi-Metallic
Ring Silver
Center Gold Plated Silver
Weight 12 g
Diameter 28.4 mm
Thickness -
Shape round
Alignment Medal
Mint
Royal Mint

Related coins

5th portrait, Gold Proof Coin

350th Anniversary of the Final Entry of Samuel Pepys Diary

Bi-Metallic, 15.97 g, ⌀ 28.4 mm