• 1 Cent 2002, KM# 445, Canada, Elizabeth II, 50th Anniversary of the Accession of Elizabeth II to the Throne, Golden Jubilee
  • 1 Cent 2002, KM# 445, Canada, Elizabeth II, 50th Anniversary of the Accession of Elizabeth II to the Throne, Golden Jubilee
Description

Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926) has been Queen of the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand since 6 February 1952. Additionally, she is Head of the Commonwealth and Queen of 12 countries that have become independent since her accession: Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Belize, Antigua and Barbuda, and Saint Kitts and Nevis.

With Elizabeth's accession, it seemed probable that the royal house would bear her husband's name, becoming the House of Mountbatten, in line with the custom of a wife taking her husband's surname on marriage. The British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, and Elizabeth's grandmother, Queen Mary, favoured the retention of the House of Windsor, and so on 9 April 1952 Elizabeth issued a declaration that Windsor would continue to be the name of the royal house. The Duke complained, "I am the only man in the country not allowed to give his name to his own children." In 1960, after the death of Queen Mary in 1953 and the resignation of Churchill in 1955, the surname Mountbatten-Windsor was adopted for Philip and Elizabeth's male-line descendants who do not carry royal titles.

Obverse

The crowned portrait of HM Queen Elizabeth II facing right, wearing the George IV State Diadem, surrounded by the inscription and dates.

The George IV State Diadem, officially the Diamond Diadem, is a type of crown that was made in 1820 for King George IV. The diadem is worn by queens and queens consort in procession to coronations and State Openings of Parliament. The piece of jewellery has been featured in paintings and on stamps and currency. It can be seen in the Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace.

ELIZABETH II DEI GRATIA REGINA means Elizabeth II, by the grace of God, Queen.

Engraver: Dora de Pédery-Hunt

ELIZABETH II D·G·REGINA
1952
2002

Reverse

A maple leaf twig is surrounded by the facial value and the inscription CANADA.

In 1834 the St. Jean-Baptiste Society, a French-Canadian patriotic group, adopted the maple leaf as their group symbol. In 1836 the newspaper "Le Canadien" named the maple leaf the official symbol of Canada, and by 1860 members of the Regiment of Royal Canadians were sporting the leaf on their badges. The leaf was featured on both the British and French-Canadian coat of arms, and it's been used on currency since the end of the 19th century. It was also a Canadian military symbol during both World Wars. The maple was designated as Canada's national tree in 1996.

Engraver: George Edward Kruger Gray

1 CENT
K•G
CANADA

Edge

1 Cent

3rd portrait, Non-magnetic
KM# 445 Schön# 439
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Characteristics
Type Commemorative Issue (Circulating)
Material Copper
Weight 2.3 g
Diameter 19.05 mm
Thickness 1.45 mm
Shape round
Alignment Medal
Mint
Royal Canadian Mint (RCM)

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