• 5 Deutsche Mark 1951-1974, KM# 112, Germany, Federal Republic
  • 5 Deutsche Mark 1951-1974, KM# 112, Germany, Federal Republic
Description

West Germany is the common English name for the Federal Republic of Germany or FRG (German: Bundesrepublik Deutschland or BRD) in the period between its creation on 23 May 1949 to German reunification on 3 October 1990. During this Cold War era, NATO-aligned West Germany and Warsaw Pact-aligned East Germany were divided by the Inner German border. After 1961 West Berlin was physically separated from East Berlin as well as from East Germany by the Berlin Wall. This situation ended when East Germany was dissolved and its five states joined the ten states of the Federal Republic of Germany along with the reunified city-state of Berlin. With the reunification of West and East Germany, the Federal Republic of Germany, enlarged now to sixteen states, became known simply as "Germany". This period is referred to as the Bonn Republic (Bonner Republik) by historians, alluding to the interwar Weimar Republic and the post-reunification Berlin Republic.

Obverse

Denomination above date. Mintmark below date.

BUNDESREPUBLIK DEUTSCHLAND
DEUTSCHE MARK
5
+ 1965 +
· G ·

Reverse

The coat of arms of Germany displays a black eagle with red feet, beak and tongue on a golden field. This is the Bundesadler or "Federal Eagle", formerly the Reichsadler or "Imperial Eagle". It is a re-introduction of the coat of arms of the Weimar Republic (in use 1919–1935) adopted by the Federal Republic of Germany in 1950. The current official design is due to Tobias Schwab (1887–1967) and was introduced in 1928.

The German Empire of 1871–1918 had re-introduced the medieval coat of arms of the Holy Roman Emperors, in use during the 13th and 14th centuries (a black single-headed eagle on a golden background), before the emperors adopted the double-headed eagle, beginning with Sigismund of Luxemburg in 1433. The single-headed Prussian Eagle was used as an escutcheon to represent the Prussian Kings as dynasts of the German Empire. The Weimar Republic introduced a version in which the escutcheon and other monarchical symbols were removed.

Different heraldic eagle's design, lettering design, different stars next to date:
Type A: thin legend
Type B: thick legend

Edge

The "Deutschlandlied" (English: "Song of Germany") has been the national anthem of Germany since 1922. Since World War II and the fall of Nazi Germany, only the third stanza has been used as the national anthem. The stanza's beginning, "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" ("Unity and Justice and Freedom") is considered the unofficial national motto of Germany, and is inscribed on modern German Army belt buckles and the rims of some German coins.

EINIGKEIT UND RECHT UND FREIHEIT

5 Deutsche Mark

KM# 112 Jaeger# 387 Schön# 110
Characteristics
Material Silver
Fineness 0.625
Weight 11.2 g
Diameter 29 mm
Thickness 2.07 mm
Shape round
Alignment Medal
Alt # KM# 112.1, KM# 112.2, KM# 112.3, KM# 112.4
Mints
Bavarian Central Mint (D)
Hamburg Mint (J)
Karlsruhe State Mint (G)
Stuttgart State Mint (F)

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