• 1 Penny 1940-1968, KM# 11, Ireland
  • 1 Penny 1940-1968, KM# 11, Ireland
Description

The penny (1d) (Irish: pingin) coin was the third smallest denomination of the pre-decimal Irish pound, worth  1⁄240 of a pound or  1⁄12 of a shilling. To express an amount, penny was abbreviated to "d", e.g. 1d, from the Roman denarius. It was introduced in 1928 to replace its British counterpart, used when all of Ireland was a constituent country of the United Kingdom. The last year of minting was 1968 and it ceased to be legal tender on 31 December 1971.

From 1928 to 1937 the date was split either side of the harp with the name Saorstát Éireann circling around. From 1938 to 1968 the inscription changed to Éire on the left of the harp and the date on the right.

Obverse

The Celtic harp is a triangular harp traditional to Brittany, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. In Ireland and Scotland it was a wire-strung instrument requiring great skill and long practice to play, and was associated with the Gaelic ruling class. In the Republic of Ireland, it appears on the coins and coat of arms.

Éire is Irish for "Ireland", the name of an island and a sovereign state.

éire 1968

Reverse

Value, hen with chicks.

Engraver: Percy Metcalfe.

1d
pingin PM

Edge

1 Penny

KM# 11 Sp# 6643
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Characteristics
Material Bronze
Weight 9.45 g
Diameter 30.9 mm
Thickness 1.76 mm
Shape round
Alignment Medal

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