• 2 Pounds 1989, KM# 961, United Kingdom (Great Britain), Elizabeth II, 300th Anniversary of the Claim of Right
  • 2 Pounds 1989, KM# 961, United Kingdom (Great Britain), Elizabeth II, 300th Anniversary of the Claim of Right
Description

The Claim of Right is an Act passed by the Parliament of Scotland in April 1689. It is one of the key documents of Scottish constitutional law.

In the Glorious Revolution, William of Orange landed with his army in England on 5 November 1688. King James VII of Scotland, who was also King of England and Ireland as James II, attempted to resist the invasion. He then sent representatives to negotiate, and he finally fled England on 23 December 1688. Whilst the Convention Parliament in England declared that James, as King of England, had abdicated the Government, and issued an English Bill of Rights on 13 February 1689 offering the Crown of England to William and Mary.

On 4 April a Convention of the Scottish Estates voted to remove James VII from office. Later that month, the Convention adopted the Claim of Right and the Article of Grievances, enumerating what they saw as the contemporary requirements of Scottish constitutional law. It also declared that, because of his actions in violation of these laws, James had forfeited the Scottish throne. The Convention proceeded to offer the crown on the basis of these documents to William and Mary, who accepted it on 11 May 1689, and were proclaimed King and Queen of the Scots as William II and Mary II.

Obverse

Third crowned portrait of HM Queen Elizabeth II facing right, wearing the George IV State Diadem.

The George IV State Diadem, officially the Diamond Diadem, is a type of crown that was made in 1820 for King George IV. The diadem is worn by queens and queens consort in procession to coronations and State Openings of Parliament. The piece of jewellery has been featured in paintings and on stamps and currency. It can be seen in the Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace.

ELIZABETH II DEI GRATIA REGINA FIDEI DEFENSATRIX means Elizabeth II, by the grace of God, Queen and Defender of the Faith.

From 1985 to 1991 the head of Queen Elizabeth II was a slightly smaller size. From 1993 to 1997 the head was a slightly larger size. The change over was made part way through 1992 so there are two versions in this year. 1997 has small varieties in design of the portrait.

Engraver: Raphael David Maklouf

ELIZABETH·II·DEI·GRATIA·REGINA·F·D
· TWO POUNDS ·
RDM

Reverse

Cypher of 'W&M' (King William and Queen Mary) interlaced surmounting a horizontal Parliamentary Mace and representation of the Crown of Scotland above and the dates 1689 and 1989 below, all within the inscription 'Tercentenary of the Claim of Right'

A ceremonial mace is a highly ornamented staff of metal or wood, carried before a sovereign or other high official in civic ceremonies by a mace-bearer, intended to represent the official's authority. The monarch is referred to as the "third part of Parliament" and signs into law the Bills which are voted on and passed in Parliament. Parliament cannot lawfully meet without the Mace, representing the monarch's authority, being present in the chambers. The maces are carried into, and out of, the two chambers in procession at the beginning and end of each day.

The Crown of Scotland is the crown that was used at the coronation of the monarchs of Scotland. Remade in its current form for King James V of Scotland in 1540, the crown is part of the Honours of Scotland, the oldest surviving set of Crown jewels in the United Kingdom. The crown dates from at least 1503 when, in an earlier form, it was depicted in the portrait of James IV of Scotland in the Book of Hours commissioned for his marriage to Margaret Tudor.

Engraver: John Lobban

TERCENTENARY OF THE CLAIM OF RIGHT
WM
1689
1989

Edge
Characteristics
Type Commemorative Issue (Circulating)
Material Nickel Brass
Weight 15.98 g
Diameter 28.4 mm
Thickness -
Shape round
Alignment Medal
Mint
Royal Mint

Related coins

3rd portrait

Edinburgh 1986 Commonwealth Games

Nickel Brass, 15.98 g, ⌀ 28.4 mm
3rd portrait, Silver Proof

Edinburgh 1986 Commonwealth Games

Silver, 15.98 g, ⌀ 28.4 mm
3rd portrait

300th Anniversary of the Bill of Rights

Nickel Brass, 15.98 g, ⌀ 28.4 mm