• 2 Rigsdaler 1863, KM# 770, Denmark, Christian IX, Death of Frederick VII and Accession of Christian IX
  • 2 Rigsdaler 1863, KM# 770, Denmark, Christian IX, Death of Frederick VII and Accession of Christian IX
Description

Commemorative type marking the death of Frederick VII and accession of Christian IX.

Frederick VII (Frederik Carl Christian) (1808–1863) was King of Denmark from 1848 to 1863. He was the last Danish monarch of the older Royal branch of the House of Oldenburg and also the last king of Denmark to rule as an absolute monarch. During his reign, he signed a constitution that established a Danish parliament and made the country a constitutional monarchy. Frederick's motto was The people's love, my strength.

Christian IX (1818–1906) was King of Denmark from 1863 to 1906. The beginning of his reign was marked by the Danish defeat in the Second Schleswig War and the subsequent loss of the duchies of Schleswig, Holstein and Lauenburg which made the king immensely unpopular. The following years of his reign were dominated by political disputes as Denmark had only become a constitutional monarchy in 1849 and the balance of power between the sovereign and parliament was still in dispute. In spite of his initial unpopularity and the many years of political strife, where the king was in conflict with large parts of the population, his popularity recovered towards the end of his reign, and he became a national icon due to the length of his reign and the high standards of personal morality with which he was identified. Christian married his second cousin, Princess Louise of Hesse-Kassel, in 1842. Their six children married into other royal families across Europe, earning him the sobriquet "the father-in-law of Europe".

Obverse

Head of Christian IX to the right.

Royal Danish Mint:
• mintmark – crown
• privy mark – RH (Rasmus Hinnerup)
• moneyer – H.C (Harald Conradsen)

CHRISTIAN IX KONGE AF DANMARK
MED GUD FOR ÆRE OG RET
H.C
1863 RH

Reverse

Head of Frederik VII to the right under the neck the moneyers' initials.

Frederick VII died in Glücksburg in 1863 following an attack of erysipelas and was interred in Roskilde Cathedral. Frederick VII managed to make himself one of the most beloved Danish kings of recent times. This was probably due partially to his relinquishment of absolutism and partially to his personality. In spite of many weaknesses documented by his contemporaries — drinking, eccentric behavior, etc. — he also possessed something of a gift as an actor. He could be both folksy and genuinely hearty, able to appear as a ”simple, yet dignified monarch”.

Royal Danish Mint's moneyer – F.K. (Frederik Christopher Krohn)

FREDERIK VII KONGE AF DANMARK
DOD DEN 15 NOVEMBER 1863
F.K
2 RIGSDALER

Edge

2 Rigsdaler

Death of Frederick VII and Accession of Christian IX

KM# 770
Characteristics
Type Commemorative Issue (Circulating)
Material Silver
Fineness 0.875
Weight 28.893 g
Diameter 38 mm
Thickness -
Shape round
Alignment Coin
Mint
Royal Danish Mint

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