Obverse. Photo © Baldwin's
  • 1 Dirham 934-940 AD, Abbasid Caliphate, Al-Radi
  • 1 Dirham 934-940 AD, Abbasid Caliphate, Al-Radi
Description

The Abbasid Caliphate (Arabic: الْخِلَافَةُ الْعَبَّاسِيَّة) was the third caliphate to succeed the Islamic prophet Muhammad. It was founded by a dynasty descended from the prophet's uncle, Abbas ibn Abdul-Muttalib (566–653 CE), from whom the dynasty takes its name. They ruled as caliphs for most of the caliphate from their capital in Baghdad in modern-day Iraq, after having overthrown the Umayyad Caliphate in the Abbasid Revolution of 750 CE (132 AH). The Abbasid Caliphate first centered its government in Kufa, modern-day Iraq, but in 762 the caliph Al-Mansur founded the city of Baghdad, near the ancient Babylonian capital city of Babylon. Baghdad became the center of science, culture and invention in what became known as the Golden Age of Islam. This, in addition to housing several key academic institutions, including the House of Wisdom, as well as a multiethnic and multi-religious environment, garnered it a worldwide reputation as the "Center of Learning".

Abu'l-Abbas Ahmad (Muhammad) ibn Ja'far al-Muqtadir (Arabic: أبو العباس أحمد (محمد) بن جعفر المقتدر, romanized: Abū al-ʿAbbās Aḥmad (Muḥammad) ibn al-Muqtadir; 909–940), usually simply known by his regnal name al-Radi bi'llah (Arabic: الراضي بالله, romanized: al-Rāḍī bi'llāh, lit. 'Content with God'), was the twentieth Caliph of the Abbasid Caliphate, reigning from 934 to his death. He died on 23 December 940 at the age of 31. His reign marked the end of the caliph's political power and the rise of military strongmen, who competed for the title of amir al-umara.

Obverse

Hare within an octagonal star, legend 'Abu-l-'Abbas al-Radi bi-Llah' around.

لله
ابو العباس الراضي بالله

Reverse

Hare within an octagonal star, legend 'Abu-l-'Abbas al-Radi bi-Llah' around.

لله
ابو العباس الراضي بالله

Edge
Characteristics
Material Silver
Weight 3.05 g
Diameter 20 mm
Thickness -
Shape round
Alignment -

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