• 24 Skilling 1763-1765, KM# 9, Danish West Indies, Frederick V
  • 24 Skilling 1763-1765, KM# 9, Danish West Indies, Frederick V
Description

The Danish West Indies was a Danish colony in the Caribbean, consisting of the islands of Saint Thomas, Saint John and Saint Croix. The Danish West India Guinea Company annexed the uninhabited island of Saint Thomas in 1672 and St. John in 1675. In 1733, Saint Croix was purchased from the French West India Company. When the Danish company went bankrupt in 1755, the King of Denmark-Norway assumed direct control of the three islands. Britain occupied the Danish West Indies in 1801–02 and 1807–15, during the Napoleonic Wars.

In 1852 the Danish parliament first debated the sale of the increasingly unprofitable colony. Denmark tried several times to sell or exchange the Danish West Indies in the late 19th and early 20th centuries: to the United States and to the German Empire respectively. The islands were eventually sold for 25 million dollars to the United States, which took over the administration on 31 March 1917, renaming the islands the United States Virgin Islands.

Obverse

Depicts a crowned monogram of King Frederick V surrounded by hit title in Latin "By the Grace of God King of Denmark, Norway, Vandalia, and Gotland".

Frederick V (Danish and Norwegian: Frederik; 1723–1766) was king of Denmark–Norway and Duke of Schleswig-Holstein from 1746 until his death. He was the son of Christian VI of Denmark and Sophia Magdalene of Brandenburg-Kulmbach.

D • G • DAN • NOR • VAN • GOT • REX •

Reverse

Depicts a port broadside view of a full-rigged ship under sail within a circle surrounded by value "24 Skillings" and the inscription "Danske Amerikansk M(ynt)" (Danish American Coinage) to distinguish them from regular Danish coins.

XXIIII • SKILL • DANSKE • AMERIKANSK • M •
• 1764 •

Edge
Characteristics
Material Silver
Fineness 0.500
Weight 6.49 g
Diameter 26 mm
Thickness 1 mm
Shape round
Alignment Medal

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