Description

The British decimal fifty pence (50p) coin – often pronounced fifty pee – is a unit of currency equaling one half of a pound sterling. Over the years, the coin has celebrated every aspect of British culture, including the stories behind the people and institutions that put the great into Great Britain. As the nation’s most collectable coin reaches a milestone moment, 50 years in circulation, The Royal Mint presented a special commemorative set to mark this momentous occasion.

From the Battle of Hastings to D-Day, epic battles have altered history’s path. Over the last 50 years, the 50p has been chosen to commemorate some of the most pivotal moments in military history, defining moments that every child still learns about in school.

This set brings together all five military-themed designs that have graced the coin: the 950th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings, the 50th anniversary of D-Day, the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain and two coins commemorating the 150th anniversary of the creation of the Victoria Cross medal.

Obverse

The fifth crowned portrait of HM Queen Elizabeth II facing right, wearing the George IV State Diadem and drop earrings.

The George IV State Diadem, officially the Diamond Diadem, is a type of crown that was made in 1820 for King George IV. The diadem is worn by queens and queens consort in procession to coronations and State Openings of Parliament. The piece of jewellery has been featured in paintings and on stamps and currency. It can be seen in the Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace.

ELIZABETH II DEI GRATIA REGINA FIDEI DEFENSATRIX means Elizabeth II, by the grace of God, Queen and Defender of the Faith.

Engraver: Jody Clark

·ELIZABETH II·D·G·REG·F·D·50 PENCE·2019
J.C

Reverse

Depiction of a soldier carrying a wounded comrade with an outline of the Victoria Cross surrounded by a sunburst effect in the background.

The Victoria Cross (VC) is the highest award of the United Kingdom honours system. It is awarded for gallantry "in the face of the enemy" to members of the British armed forces. It may be awarded posthumously. It may be awarded to a person of any military rank in any service and to civilians under military command although no civilian has received the award since 1879. Since the first awards were presented by Queen Victoria in 1857, two thirds of all awards have been personally presented by the British monarch. These investitures are usually held at Buckingham Palace.

The VC was introduced on 29 January 1856 by Queen Victoria to honour acts of valour during the Crimean War. Since then, the medal has been awarded 1,358 times to 1,355 individual recipients. Only 15 medals, 11 to members of the British Army, and four to the Australian Army, have been awarded since the Second World War. The traditional explanation of the source of the metal from which the medals are struck is that it derives from Russian cannon captured at the Siege of Sevastopol. Some research has suggested a variety of origins for the material. Research has established that the metal for most of the medals made since December 1914 came from two Chinese cannons that were captured from the Russians in 1855.

The decoration is a bronze cross pattée, bearing the crown of Saint Edward surmounted by a lion, and the inscription FOR VALOUR. This was originally to have been FOR THE BRAVE, until it was changed on the recommendation of Queen Victoria, as it implied that not all men in battle were brave. The cross is suspended by a ring from a seriffed "V" to a bar ornamented with laurel leaves, through which the ribbon passes. The reverse of the suspension bar is engraved with the recipient's name, rank, number and unit. On the reverse of the medal is a circular panel on which the date of the act for which it was awarded is engraved in the centre.

Engraver: Clive Duncan

FIFTY PENCE
CD

Edge

50 Pence

5th portrait, Gold Proof Coin

Celebrating 50 Years of the 50p
Military, 150th Anniversary of the Institution of the Victoria Cross, Soldiers

Subscribe series
KM#
Characteristics
Type Commemorative Issue (Non-circulating)
Material Gold
Fineness 0.916
Weight 15.5 g
Diameter 27.3 mm
Thickness -
Shape polygon
Sides 7
Alignment Medal
Mint
Royal Mint

Related coins

5th portrait, British Culture, 50 New Pence

Celebrating 50 Years of the 50p

Cupronickel, 8 g, ⌀ 27.3 mm
5th portrait, British Culture, Girl Guides

Celebrating 50 Years of the 50p

Cupronickel, 8 g, ⌀ 27.3 mm
5th portrait, British Culture, Kew Gardens

Celebrating 50 Years of the 50p

Cupronickel, 8 g, ⌀ 27.3 mm