Obverse. Photo © Banco de México
  • 100 Pesos 2011, KM# 954, Mexico, Numismatic Heritage of Mexico, Peso de Bolita
  • 100 Pesos 2011, KM# 954, Mexico, Numismatic Heritage of Mexico, Peso de Bolita
  • 100 Pesos 2011, KM# 954, Mexico, Numismatic Heritage of Mexico, Peso de Bolita, 1 Peso 1913, Peso de Bolita
Description

In 2011, the Mexican Mint started a four year series featuring 24 classic coins of Mexico. This fine collection of Bi-Metallic Silver (0.925) coins represents about five centuries of the numismatic heritage of Mexico which includes famous coins ranging from the first coins minted by la Casa de Moneda de México, the Mexican Mint, during the XVI century, to contemporary XX century mints. The collection not only offers insight into the evolution of the Mexican coin, but is also a window on Mexican history and art, besides fostering coin collecting and numismatics.

Obverse

Depicts the seal of the United Mexican States.

The Seal of the United Mexican States is a modified version of the national coat of arms, with the addition of the full official name of the country Estados Unidos Mexicanos, in a semi-circular accommodation in the upper part of the seal. Current and past Mexican peso coinage have had the seal engraved on the obverse of all denominations.

The coat of arms depicts a Mexican golden eagle perched on a prickly pear cactus devouring a rattlesnake. To the people of Tenochtitlan this would have strong religious connotations, but to the Europeans, it would come to symbolize the triumph of good over evil (with the snake sometimes representative of the serpent in the Garden of Eden).

ESTADO UNIDOS MEXICANOS

Reverse

At the center, the image of the reverse of a Peso de Bolita (Little Ball), 1 Peso 1913 (KM# 610), minted in Hidalgo del Parral, Chihuahua; at the upper side, parallel to the coin frame, the legend NUMISMATIC HERITAGE OF MEXICO; on the left side, the Mexican mint mark, while on the right field is the $100.

The Little Ball Peso is one of the most famous coins of the Mexican Revolution (so called for the circle over the denomination). The coin was part of the first Villa mint and was probably ordered by Francisco Villa himself or by General Maclovio Herrera in October 1913. Its rough cut reflects the precarious conditions in which most coins were minted during the Revolution.

HERENCIA NUMISMATICA DE MEXICO
Mo 2011
$100

Edge
Characteristics
Type Commemorative Issue (Non-circulating)
Material Bi-Metallic
Ring Aluminium Bronze
Center Silver
Weight 33.97 g
Diameter 39 mm
Thickness 4 mm
Shape round
Alignment Coin
Mint
Mexican Mint (Mo)

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