• 1 Dollar 2020, United States of America (USA), Native American $1 Coin Program, Elizabeth Peratrovich and Alaska’s Anti-Discrimination Law
  • 1 Dollar 2020, United States of America (USA), Native American $1 Coin Program, Elizabeth Peratrovich and Alaska’s Anti-Discrimination Law
Description

The Sacagawea dollar (also known as the "golden dollar") is a United States dollar coin that has been minted every year since 2000. These coins have a copper core clad by manganese brass, giving them a distinctive golden color. From 2000 to 2008, the reverse featured an eagle design by Thomas D. Rogers. Since 2009, the reverse of the Sacagawea dollar has been changed yearly, with each design in the series depicting a different aspect of Native American cultures celebrating the important contributions made by Indian tribes and individual Native Americans to the history and development of the United States.

Obverse

Profile of Sacagawea with her infant son, Jean Baptiste Charbonneau being carried on her back.

Sacagawea (1788-1812) was a Lemhi Shoshone woman who helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition achieve each of its chartered mission objectives exploring the Louisiana Purchase. With the expedition, between 1804 and 1806, she traveled thousands of miles from North Dakota to the Pacific Ocean, established cultural contacts with Native American populations, and researched natural history.

The Lewis and Clark Expedition, also known as the Corps of Discovery Expedition, was the first American expedition to cross what is now the western portion of the United States, departing in May 1804, from near St. Louis making their way westward through the continental divide to the Pacific coast.

Engraver: Glenna Goodacre (GG)

LIBERTY
IN GOD
WE TRUST
GG

Reverse

Depicts a portrait of Elizabeth Peratrovich. The foreground features a symbol of the Tlingit Raven moiety, of which she was a member. The Tlingit are indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast of North America. The Tlingit kinship system, like most Northwest Coast societies, is based on a matrilineal structure, and describes a family roughly according to Morgan's Crow system of kinship. The society is wholly divided into two distinct moieties, termed Raven (Yéil) and Eagle/Wolf (Ch'aak'/Ghooch).

Elizabeth Jean Peratrovich (1911–1958), Tlingit nation, was an important civil rights activist; she worked on behalf of equality for Alaska Natives. In the 1940s, she was credited with advocacy that gained the passage of the territory's Anti-Discrimination Act of 1945, the first anti-discrimination law in the United States. In March 2019, her obituary was added to the New York Times as part of their "Overlooked No More" series.

In 1941, while living in Juneau, the Peratroviches found more discrimination, having difficulty finding housing and seeing signs banning Native entry to public facilities. They petitioned the territorial governor, Ernest Gruening, to ban the "No Natives Allowed" signs then common at public accommodations in that city and elsewhere. The Anti-Discrimination Act was defeated by the territorial legislature in 1943. As leaders of the Alaska Native Brotherhood and the Alaska Native Sisterhood, the Peratroviches lobbied the territory's legislators and represented their organizations in their testimony. Elizabeth Peratrovich was the last to testify before the territorial Senate voted on the bill in 1945, and her impassioned testimony was considered decisive.

Engraver: Phebe Hemphill

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
ELIZABETH
PERATROVICH
PH $1
ANTI-DISCRIMINATION LAW OF 1945

Edge

Inscribed along the edge of the coin is the year of minting or issuance of the coin, the mint mark, and also the legend "E Pluribus Unum" (Latin for "Out of many, one").

Position A: edge lettering reads upside-down when Sacagawea's portrait (obverse) faces up.
Position B: edge lettering reads normally when Sacagawea's portrait (obverse) faces up.

2020 P ★★★ E PLURIBUS UNUM ★★★★★★★★★★

1 Dollar

Native American $1 Coin Program
Elizabeth Peratrovich and Alaska’s Anti-Discrimination Law

Subscribe series
KM#
Characteristics
Type Commemorative Issue (Circulating)
Material Manganese Brass
Weight 8.1 g
Diameter 26.5 mm
Thickness -
Shape round
Alignment Coin
Mints
Denver Mint (D)
Philadelphia Mint (P)
San Francisco Mint (S)

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