Obverse. Photo © Heritage Auctions
  • 100 Pounds 1987, KM# 613, Egypt, Pharaonic Treasure, Golden Ram's-head Amulet
  • 100 Pounds 1987, KM# 613, Egypt, Pharaonic Treasure, Golden Ram's-head Amulet
Description

Golden Ram's-head Amulet (ca. 712–664 B.C., Third Intermediate Period, now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art) was probably made for a necklace worn by one of the Kushite kings. Representations show these pharaohs wearing a ram's-head amulet tied around the neck on a thick cord, the ends of which fall forward over the shoulders. Sometimes a smaller ram's head is attached to each end. Rams were associated with the god Amun, particularly in Nubia, where he was especially revered.

Obverse

Depicts the Ram's-head Amulet.

An amulet, also known as a good luck charm, is an object believed to confer protection upon its possessor. The word "amulet" comes from the Latin word amuletum, which Pliny's Natural History describes as "an object that protects a person from trouble". Anything can function as an amulet; items commonly so used include gems, statues, coins, drawings, plant parts, animal parts, and written words.

Reverse

Stylized state name (Arab Republic of Egypt) divides denomination in Arabic and English as well as the date in Arabic (Hijri) and Western (Georgian) calendars. Mintmark (FM) and abbreviation of state name (ARE) below.

1987 ١٩٨٧
100 ١٠٠
Pounds جنيه
جمهورية مصر العربية
FM
A.R.E.

Edge

100 Pounds

Pharaonic Treasure
Golden Ram's-head Amulet

Subscribe series
KM# 613
Characteristics
Type Commemorative Issue (Non-circulating)
Material Gold
Fineness 0.900
Weight 17 g
Diameter -
Thickness -
Shape round
Alignment Medal
Mint
Franklin Mint (FM)

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